Olufemi Adegbesan

Olufemi Adegbesan

Olufemi Adegbesan
University of Ibadan

Professor Olufemi Adegbesan is currently with the department of Human Kinetics and Health Education, University of Ibadan and an adjunct Professor with Pan African University. His research interest is grouped under three main themes in Psychology of Sport and Exercise domain: These are Motivation in sport and Exercise; Psychology of sport injury; and Mental skills application to elite sport, exercise and recreation participation.

Abstract

Psychosocial and Demographic predictors of Doping Intentions among Adolescent Athletes in Nigeria

Doping represents a significant problem in sports and there is a growing body of empirical evidence on demographic and psychosocial predictors of doping behavioural intentions and utilizing a variety of variables and conceptual models. Survey reports suggest a much higher prevalence of doping approximately 10%- 15% of competitive and recreational athletes report past or current use of doping, with some studies suggesting even higher percentages. The narratives from a psycho-sociological perspective suggest that adolescent athletes are especially susceptible to social pressures and expectations regarding sports competition, and tend to participate in doping behaviour which has possible harmful long-term effects on their wellbeing. The current study examined the demographic and psycho-sociological predictors of doping intentions among adolescent athletes in Nigeria.

Descriptive design was used and participants consisted of male (69) and female (31) adolescent athletes with mean age (17.33, sd 5.42). Ethical approval from the appropriate authority and informed consent from participants were granted. Data were collected with the Psycho-Social Doping Questionnaire (r=0.82) and Behavioural Intention Questionnaire (r=0.74). Statistical analysis was performed on the data with the pearson’s correlation and regression analysis.

Results revealed that Stimulants (60%) ranked highest of the drugs used by athletes and dominant with (53%) of the male athletes.

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